Acadia National Park 2015

As mentioned in my 7/30/2015 post, my passion for photographing our national parks grew from Acadia National Park in Maine – a location that has regularly drawn me back since the early 1980s.   During part of my most recent visit, I participated in a Green Mountain Photographic Workshop conducted by Kurt Budliger and Joe Rossbach. For the remainder, my wife and I explored Acadia on our own. Acadia provides so much varied beauty – on each visit, I always find something new to accompany the familiar. My most recent trip proved to be no exception.

I had not photographed the Duck Brook area in the past, but photographed on three days of this trip – twice on my own and once with the workshop.   Each occasion provided very different and challenging weather conditions, from rain/mist to overcast to clear and sunny.   The area is a microcosm of much of Acadia – with a beautiful stream running under a classic stone bridge, beaver ponds and marshes, open granite punctuated by lichens and blueberry bushes, and great fall color.

Autumn Spirals. Nikon D810 DSLR. Nikkor 24-70 mm f2.8. Singh Ray LB Color Combo Polarizer. Really Right Stuff TVC-24L Versa Series 3 Tripod. Really Right Stuff BH-40 Ballhead. Fstop Loka Pack. © Chuck Lockett Photography 2015.

Autumn Spirals. Nikon D810 DSLR. Nikkor 24-70 mm f2.8. Singh Ray LB Color Combo Polarizer. Really Right Stuff TVC-24L Versa Series 3 Tripod. Really Right Stuff BH-40 Ballhead. Fstop Loka Pack. © Chuck Lockett Photography 2015.

I photographed from the west side of Beech Mountain on my previous trip, but the conditions were too clear and didn’t provide for the image I imagined. After spending a week photographing at Acadia, the best sunset conditions came on our last evening and proved to be very different from my previous visit. After a quick 20-minute hike, my wife and I set up on one of the granite outcrops above the trail. The wind was blowing, the temperature was cold, and the photographic conditions were incredible. The brisk wind blew heavy broken clouds from north to south as the sun set behind Mansell Mountain to the west. To the north, the clouds reflected the setting sun over Long Pond with a beam occasionally spotlighting the trees in fall color below.

Sunset Over Long Pond. Nikon D810 DSLR. Nikkor 24-70 mm f2.8. Really Right Stuff TVC-24L Versa Series 3 Tripod. Really Right Stuff BH-40 Ballhead. Fstop Loka Pack. © Chuck Lockett Photography 2015.

Sunset Over Long Pond. Nikon D810 DSLR. Nikkor 24-70 mm f2.8. Really Right Stuff TVC-24L Versa Series 3 Tripod. Really Right Stuff BH-40 Ballhead. Fstop Loka Pack. © Chuck Lockett Photography 2015.

To the south, a granite outcropping with evergreen trees and blueberry bushes provided foreground against the shadowed Mansell Mountain the west with rose tinted clouds pushing rapidly toward Blue Hill Bay in the distance. I shot until the light faded – some to the north, some to the south – basically shifting my view as the clouds changed shape and the color shifted.

Fiery Sunset From Beech Mountain. Nikon D810 DSLR. Nikkor 24-70 mm f2.8. Really Right Stuff TVC-24L Versa Series 3 Tripod. Really Right Stuff BH-40 Ballhead. Fstop Loka Pack. © Chuck Lockett Photography 2015.

Fiery Sunset From Beech Mountain. Nikon D810 DSLR. Nikkor 24-70 mm f2.8. Really Right Stuff TVC-24L Versa Series 3 Tripod. Really Right Stuff BH-40 Ballhead. Fstop Loka Pack. © Chuck Lockett Photography 2015.

All I can say is nature provided so much more than imagined!

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One Comment

  1. L November 16, 2015 at 8:51 pm #

    Very nice photos!

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